ROP in Preemies

ROP, an acronym for retinopathy of prematurity, is relatively common in premature babies. The earlier the preemie(e.g. 23 or 24 weeks) the higher the chance the child will develop ROP. Don’t fret, our child has ROP, you are not alone. Our baby will have her corrective surgery tomorrow, and we have got the rundown on this diagnosis for you. ROP, in a very simplified definition, is the healthy blood vessels in the eye not reaching the outer edges of the eyes. Think of it like this, if you water your lawn but the spinner doesn’t reach the edges of your yard, the middle of your lawn will be green surrounded by a brown(dead) outer layer. So in ROP, when the blood vessels don’t reach the outsides of their eyes not only can the outer layer die but the child can become blind or experience rental detachment due to the undertones of the disease.

How is it corrected?

ROP is corrected via surgery. Your child will likely be put completely to sleep for this surgery. Although it is a minor surgery with minimal recovery time, one wrong move by the child during surgery could cause a serious adverse reaction. When the child is asleep the outsides of the eyes(where blood vessels are not reaching) will be lasered(laser) thus incapacitating(killing) the area of the eye that is not being reached by blood vessels. This sounds extreme but it is for the betterment of the child. All the child is sacrificing is a very minimal peripheral line of sight; the alternative is loosing all sight. Your child will never be able to tell the difference and will still be able to drive, play sports, and do everything any person would be able to do. Try not to fret, we are going through the same thing. Be fortunate your child is alive, and will be able to see. God bless! Comment below with your experience.

Preemie cloths are hard to find. Formula is as well. The only cloths we could find that fit came from Amazon. Click the boxes above to view preemie cloths and formula. Thanks!

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